Thursday, August 30, 2012


Transparency International is deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Jeremy Pope, a founding member and strategic thinker who in many ways symbolized our movement’s enthusiastic commitment to fight corruption.
“The passing of Jeremy Pope is a sombre moment for all of us at Transparency International. For many years Jeremy Pope played a key role in building the intellectual strength that backed up the consciousness-raising so vital to Transparency International. He was instrumental in creating many of the pillars that Transparency International stands upon today,” the Chair of Transparency International Huguette Labelle said.
Jeremy Pope was the founding Managing Director of Transparency International from 1994 to 1998 and later Executive Director of Transparency International’s London Office with responsibility for knowledge management. He created one of Transparency International’s first source books, which was used to identify and address corruption risks in government and society, and is now the basis for the National Integrity Systems assessment, a tool that in many ways defines Transparency International. 
“Jeremy Pope was indeed one of the intellectual fathers of Transparency International. He joined our organisation with a deep knowledge of institutions, how they should work, and the impact on society when they fail. He did help Transparency International develop pioneering ways to define and fight corruption. From the moment he accepted to become Managing Director of the TI-Secretariat in 1994 until his departure, he was my strongest partner and friend in building the TI movement,” said Peter Eigen, the founder and former Chair of Transparency International and currently Chairman of its Advisory Council.
Jeremy Pope pursued his long-time concern with the human rights dimension of corruption when he was appointed Commissioner on the New Zealand Human Rights Commission.

Transparency International is the global civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption.

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